Ready Golf
An introduction to Ready Golf
The R&A and the USGA previewed new rules on 1 March 2017 as part of a joint initiative to modernize the Rules and make them easier to understand and apply. Key changes include rules to help with Pace of Play and how to drop a ball. Golfers have been asked to give their views on the proposed changes during six-month feedback and evaluation period, with the new Rules of Golf taking effect on 1 January 2019.

Those involved in the game of golf may have differing views on what constitutes an acceptable pace of play, but there is no doubt that slow play can detract from the enjoyment of the game for many golfers. It is the R&A’s strongly held view that there are solutions available that can improve the situation and the R&A has produced a Pace of Play Manual that pulls together a wide range of potential solutions. It may be that one single change in procedure does not, of itself, bring about huge change. However, introducing a few the initiatives offered in the Manual, and staying committed to those initiatives, can and will make a difference. The Manual can be downloaded from www.randa.org.

In this year’s Amateur Championship (stroke play rounds) the R&A is adopting the principle of “Ready Golf” to assist with pace of play. Competitors in the R&A Spring Medal over the Old Course last week were asked to do the same, and many members noticed an improvement in pace of play.

Thus, the Committee of ALGC would like all members to adopt the initiative of “Ready Golf” in all competitions except match play. Examples of this are as follows

• Hitting a shot when safe to do so if a player father away faces a challenging shot and is taking time to assess their options.
• Shorter hitters playing first from the tee or fairway if longer hitters have to wait.
• Hitting a tee shot if the person with the honour is delayed in being ready to play.
• Hitting a shot before helping someone to look for a lost ball.
• Putting out even if it means standing close to someone else’s line.
• Hitting a shot if a person who has just played from a greenside bunker is still farthest from the hole but is delayed due to raking a bunker.
• When a player’s ball has gone over the back of a green, any player closer to the hole but chipping from the front of the green should play while the other player is having to walk to their ball and assess their shot.

Copies of these suggestions will be available on sheets in the Clubhouse, and if you have any questions please don’t hesitate to ask me or a member of the committee.


Fiona Seedhouse 11.5.17.